ghostwriting


 

What are some of the differences between developmental editing and ghostwriting?

 

Ghostwriters write the first drafts of chapters. Developmental editors collaborate with the author on getting the first drafts written.

 

Ghostwriters will interview clients, look at writing the author may already have done (blog pieces, articles, etc.) and work with the expert to create a chapter outline. In contrast, a developmental editor will improve the list of contents the author created. Both of these book publishing professionals help an author conceive of what needs to go in the book and what can be left out, but a developmental editor has much more to work with—a manuscript, whether it’s complete or not.

 

The process of collaboration between the book publishing professional and the client can differ from what I’ve described, but in general, it’s the ghostwriter who does the initial writing on any chapter and who does most if not all of the crafting of the chapter outline. I do both ghostwriting and developmental editing, and my clients know I’m flexible with how the work gets done most efficiently. I have clients who have nothing on paper or in a computer document when they first approach me about helping them with their book. Often, they like to start by dictating their ideas into a phone and then send me the digital file of what they dictated. After that, we have some back and forth about their stories and ideas by email and phone. Other clients come to me with a very rough “stream of consciousness” draft that’s as long as the manuscript for a book ready to go into production. Creating that manuscript helped them get clear on the book they want to write and their strengths and weaknesses in getting it to be well-shaped and well-written, but the writing process taught them that they need professional help to get the book in shape. Sometimes, they can do it on their own with coaching and some development help. Sometimes, they know they don’t want to try to create a new draft on their own. They’re certain they’re ready to hire a ghostwriter.

 

Ghostwriters create the voice for the writing. Developmental editors make suggestions and comments about where the voice is working or not working and will point out any inconsistencies in voice.

 

Let’s say you’re a physician and in your writing, you use too many words a lay reader won’t understand or will be intimidated by. A developmental editor will point out words to change and will probably suggest some alternatives. A developmental editor will also suggest ways to improve your writing, such as avoiding the passive voice. (“Mistakes were made” is an example of passive voice. “I made mistakes” is an example of active voice.) A developmental editor will also note the types of grammar and punctuation errors you’ve made and remind you to check these when you create the next draft. I commonly see people use colons (:) when they mean to use semicolons (;) and start a sentence with a clause that doesn’t go with the subject of the sentence. (“As the parent of three children, too many kids are not learning how to manage money.” “Too many kids” is not the subject of the verb “are not learning.” “As the parent of three children, I believe…” would be a grammatical way to set up a sentence like this one.) Line editors, also known as copyeditors, can go through the next draft and correct all the mistakes.

 

Ghostwriters? Well, ghostwriters aren’t supposed to make errors in grammar and punctuation. Thus, every single one of my first drafts I write as a ghostwriter is flawless…. Okay, nearly flawless. The point is that at the early stages of writing, there are bound to be some errors that need to get fixed along the way, but the ghostwriter really does have to have mastery of grammar and punctuation rules. I know my gerundives from my gerunds—you, as my client, don’t have to!

 

What do ghostwriters and developmental editors have in common?

 

Ghostwriters revise additions and changes made by the author. Developmental editors typically don’t. While a ghostwriter will create a first draft of a chapter or section of the book, the author might add to the document. For example, in doing developmental editing, I will often suggest a transition sentence or main idea sentence that can provide clarity. When reviewing the Word document that’s been prepared by a ghostwriter, a client can type in words and answers to queries that have been embedded within it or offer comments in an email or over the phone or Skype before a second draft is prepared. Developmental editors commonly leave it up to the client to make changes before taking the manuscript to the next stage in the process of publication. However, a client might decide to hire the developmental editor look at some or all of the revised draft, especially if the changes were quite extensive.

 

Ghostwriters and developmental editors do not share writing credit, get their name on the front of the book, or share the liability with the author for the material in the book. Professional ghostwriters, developmental editors, and copyeditors will check facts the author includes in the book. However, ultimately, the author maintains the liability for mistakes. Recognize that memory can be faulty, so be sure to fact check your own book. As for credit on the book, sometimes ghostwriters turn into co-writers after conversations between them and the client, but it’s not very common.

 

As you can see, there are overlaps between the two different jobs but some key differences, too. By sharing drafts of your material back and forth, you and your ghostwriter/developmental editor can decide how you can work together most effectively to get your book written professionally.

 

Make sense? Let me know if you need my help. Drop me a line at info at nancy at nancypeske.com or use my contact form and give me a sense of where you are with your project and what kind of help you think you need as well as your budget if you know what it is.

 

Developmental Editor

Ghostwriting and developmental editing have some overlaps and some differences.

ghostwriting


Ghostwriters don’t often get attention. Being invisible is pretty much baked into our job description! However, I was just recognized by Feedspot for having one of the top 40 ghostwriter blogs on the Internet, and I’ll wear that as a badge of honor even though I can’t officially admit to ghostwriting anything. You will have to trust me on my ghostwriting experience. Shhhhh! Best ghostwriter blog . . . well, my blog IS for people seeking a ghostwriter, and I know some ghostwriters have learned from me by reading it. I’ll take the badge!

best ghostwriter blog top 40

My blog and NancyPeske.com was honored as one of the top 40 ghostwriter blogs by Feedspot. Yay!

 

How do I work as a ghostwriter? The partnership between my clients and me varies wildly from client to client, book to book, and even chapter to chapter. Quite often, I don’t even ghostwrite. Instead, I do developmental editing, consulting, and coaching. I commonly help a client stay true to her brand by going over a manuscript she has drafted and making specific suggestions about voice, tone, and content as well as structure and approach. We talk about title, message, audience, and platform, and what this book is meant to be.

 

New clients sometimes have trouble understanding this “big picture” approach to editorial development. I think that’s because many people mistakenly assume they know what editors do and what editing is. It’s more complicated than merely “fixing” text. You may want to hire me as a ghostwriter, which is a big commitment on your part and mine, but we may end up working together differently—with me serving as more of a developmental editor, book writing coach, and book publishing consultant. So while on some projects, I will ghostwrite—interview the client, write all the drafts, and go over them with the client, who then makes changes in the document or suggests them over the phone—very often, what I’m doing is less writing and more developmental editing, strategizing, shaping, and branding.

 

Want to get started? Here are the options:

 

Are you solidly committed to spending five figures on a ghostwriter? Fill out my contact form. That way, I can help you determine whether I might be the best ghostwriter for you, let you know whether I’m available, and steer you toward a highly talented colleague if need be.

 

Are you unsure of whether you want to make a big financial commitment to ghostwriting, but certain you want to get your book written and published? Fill out my contact form and tell me more.

 

Give me some details and it will be much easier for me to help you.

 

Your book idea CAN go from vision to reality!

 

And if you want to access the insights of a bestselling ghostwriter, developmental editor, book writing coach, and book publishing consultant, be sure to sign up for my newsletter on my home page, which will deliver my blog to your in box (plus you’ll get a copy of my eBook 7 Great Tips for Finding the Perfect Publisher). Thanks!

Nancy Peske hire a ghostwriter developmental editor

I’m not an actual ghost, just a ghostwriter…and developmental editor…and book writing coach…and book publishing consultant.

ghostwriting


You’ve dreamed about writing a book someday. You believe you have a story inside you that will amaze and inspire people. You’ve tried to write it down, and have sketched out some ideas here and there. Maybe you have notebooks or computer files that are filled with writing but you’re realizing that all these bits and pieces aren’t adding up to a book. Do you need to hire a ghostwriter?

Perhaps, but first there are four crucial questions to ask yourself:

1. Do I understand what a ghostwriter can do for me? A ghostwriter, or “work-for-hire” writer, writes for other people but does not receive public credit and her name won’t appear on the book jacket or the book’s copyright notice. She’s a “ghost” because she works invisibly, behind the scenes. A ghostwriter for a book structures and shapes the book, including its scenes or sections, and renders the expert’s ideas on the page in a way that is true to her client’s vision. Her client, not the ghostwriter, retains the claim to the book’s copyright and takes responsibility for the material in the pages. A professional ghostwriter can alert her client to potential legal issues, but ultimately, the book she will ghostwrite will be her client’s baby. In fact, you might think of a ghostwriter as a professional midwife for books.

2. Do I secretly want to be a writer, or do I simply want my story and ideas told in my voice? An excellent ghostwriter will listen to how you express yourself in person or over the phone. She will notice the complexity of your sentence structure, your pet phrases, and your tone. Then, as she begins to ghostwrite your book, she’ll create a voice that sounds as if it were yours. She knows that if you’re serious and dignified, your voice on the page should be different than if you’re playful and whimsical.

If your heart tells you that it’s you who must write every word of your book, you must be willing to master the craft of writing a book. Hire a writing coach, take writing classes, and read books on writing. Commit to the time it will take to master your craft and write your book. If you hire a ghostwriter when you truly want to be the writer, you’ll find it difficult to create a good partnership with her. You need to trust the ghostwriter to capture your voice and ideas or she won’t be able to do her job properly.

A ghostwriter or developmental editor may be key to getting your book written

3. Do I have the money to hire someone to interview me and write a book based on my life or ideas? It can take hundreds of hours of a ghostwriter’s time to interview you and ghostwrite a quality book for you. You’ll need tens of thousands of dollars to hire a professional ghostwriter to ghostwrite a memoir, self-help book, or novel based on your ideas and synopsis. If you procure a book contract and an advance against future earnings from a publisher, you can use that money to hire someone to ghostwrite or coauthor your book. If your budget is too tight to pay a five-figure fee to a book ghostwriter, remember that you get what you pay for. Will you be content with a book that isn’t well structured or well-written, a book that doesn’t have rich ideas and a narrative flow that’s engaging and entertaining? If you don’t have a publishing contract and paying a ghostwriter will be a problem for you, see question #1 and rethink whether you might be willing to learn to write the book yourself rather than hire someone to ghostwrite a book for you.

4. Do I know what I want to say? Everyone has ideas and stories to write about, but you may not have enough to say to fill a book unless you work with a professional ghostwriter who can draw stories out of you, find the narrative arc to your book, and help you develop your ideas. In fact, if you want to write your own book and you have good writing skills, but are stuck on what to say, you may not need a ghostwriter so much as a developmental editor. A developmental editor can help you flesh out your ideas and structure your book.

Whatever your goal, I hope you won’t let fear, insecurity, or embarrassment influence your decision about whether to write your book yourself or hire a ghostwriter to ghostwrite it for you. If you honor your strengths as well as your weaknesses, you’ll come to the right decision for you regarding who should write your book. Know what type of assistance you need and you won’t regret your decision, whatever it turns out to be.

And if you are serious about hiring a ghostwriter and have a budget in the five figures, do contact me at info@nancypeske.com and let’s see if I’m the write ghostwriter for you.