branding


Are you trying to establish your brand as distinct from others? A book written by you can serve as a credibility card for your expertise in your field of interest.

 

Branding yourself with a book can help set you apart from experts that do similar work. It gives you a chance to show people what’s different about you, your message, and your methods.

 

To get started, or unstuck if you began writing but ran out of enthusiasm for your book, think about what sets you apart. What’s your story? How did you come to start your business or organization?

 

How did you begin writing and speaking about the subjects you cover? What inspired you?

 

What did you do to go from your lowest point to your highest point of success, whether it’s success in business, managing the challenges in life, parenting, or something else?

 

If I come to your website’s About page, what will I read? What photos of you will I see? If you’re a physician but also a motivational speaker, will I pick that up quickly by looking at the images of you and any other graphics? If you don’t yet have a website, start to build one. I like Wix and find it very easy to use if you know nothing about coding. Some people prefer WordPress or Squarespace or Godaddy’s website builder.

 

Also, think about who will connect with your brand. Reid Tracy, CEO of Hay House Publishing, has said that a book for everyone is a book for no one. The truth is that no brand and no book will appeal to every single person. That’s okay: You’ll have a brand and a book that appeals to a defined audience.

 

credibility card expert brand yourself with a book

Brand yourself with a book that serves as a credibility card for your expertise.

 

Maybe your followers will be business owners—in other words, you have a business-to-business or B2B brand.

 

Maybe your followers and fans will be parents who are in a similar situation to one you were in when you began developing your expertise in a particular area of parenting. My book Raising a Sensory Smart Child: The Definitive Guide to Helping Your Child with Sensory Processing Issues originated when I was desperate to find a book that would answer my questions and give me strategies for parenting a child with sensory issues. The book appeals to parents of kids with sensory issues but also to a secondary audience: professionals who work with these kids. For example, occupational therapists, psychologists, and teachers make up a big part of the book’s fan base. Raising a Sensory Smart Child has served as my credibility card and helped me book speaking engagements and teach workshops on the topic of helping kids who have sensory issues. What’s more, it has helped me to create a legacy book (with the help of my coauthor, Lindsey Biel) and fulfill my desire to make a difference in the world. It feels wonderful to know my book has changed many family’s lives for the better!

 

Another thing to think about when conceptualizing your book is that you need to have enough experience to be able to offer valuable insights and strategies to readers, using stories from your life and your work to illustrate your ideas. I often hear from clients who are eager to get started writing a book that can help other people but haven’t yet done the actual work of researching what else is out there on their topic. They aren’t clear on what they have to offer that no one else does. Put simply, they aren’t ready to write an entire book. They may, however, be ready to write a mini book, start writing and speaking publicly, and begin researching what else is being said on their topic and what has yet to be explored.

 

If you’re an aspiring author who isn’t established as an expert in your field but you feel you do have a fresh take on a topic, think about getting a foreword for your book or teaming with a coauthor who can help you boost your book’s visibility and your brand’s credibility. Many moms of kids with sensory issues did what I did: researched our children’s issues and joined support groups and exchanged ideas, strategies, and insights. However, I teamed up with a professional who treats kids with sensory issues and we got someone with a highly recognizable name and credibility among parents of kids with sensory issues to write us a foreword. I then did original research, including interviewing experts who had worked with teenagers who have sensory processing disorder. I knew that other books on sensory issues that were available had nothing about how to help kids once they reach adolescence. Through doing my own research, I came to know more about this particular topic than many people who were already writing about sensory issues.

 

I wasn’t coaching parents when I cowrote my book, and you don’t have to be a coach or consultant if you’re writing a book on a topic, but it helps if you can draw on stories other than your own. If you want to interview people for your book, where will you find them? How will you disguise their stories to protect their privacy? You can also draw anecdotes from wisdom tradition teaching stories (think of the blind men and the elephant, or the story from Buddhism of the overflowing cup of tea) and from current and historical events.

 

Exercises and action plans that are typically a part of a self-help book are important takeaways readers expect. If you are only just beginning to work as a coach or consultant, you might want your book to be more focused on themes and lessons: You can write a book of lessons, principles, or strategies or a short memoir. Even so, it’s good to have some exercises. You might want to create a quiz or exercises that are unique to you. These could be guided visualizations, meditations, journaling questions, or something else. Here’s an example of a guided visualization a client created and developed a video for that is tied into his messaging about working with the Earth for healing and accessing the wisdom of the unconscious.

 

Finally, as you think about writing your book, remember that people think of a book as a substantial document that also has a shape and structure rather than simply being a long document that got printed and stapled. Begin envisioning what your book will look and feel like as a physical object. Get a sense of how many words you need to write. A typical self-help book has somewhere around 50,000 to 70,000 words, for example.

 

Start typing or dictating into software that turns speech into text and see where you go. How much can you get down before you get stuck on what more you want to say?

 

You might have the basis for a strong book for your brand but need help fleshing out your ideas and expanding on them. Many aspiring authors are used to short-form writing and could use some help turning their ideas into a long-form book. Don’t give up! Get some insights from a professional writer, editor, and consultant who works with authors aspiring to brand themselves with a book. Check out comparative books and see what is out there on the Internet if you do a search for the type of information, strategies, and support people will find in your book.

 

Search Amazon, too. Use keywords but also use questions people might ask, such as, “How do I help my middle schooler do better in school” or “What’s the best way to way to pay off my student loan earlier?” Ask yourself, “Given what’s out there on this topic, why would someone want to hear what I have to say, buy my book, and read it?” If you can answer that, you have a solid foundation to begin branding yourself with a book and firmly establishing yourself as an expert on your topic.

 

Where are you in your writing and publishing journey? Do you need a few tips, a fresh strategy, or feedback on what you’ve written so far? Contact me if you’re feeling stuck and need help: info@nancypeske.com

 

 

 

Many authors want to use their book to launch a career as a speaker but have only done a few presentations. How do you get more speaking engagements? By showing off why you would be an engaging, informative speaker. Have a section on your website that sells you as a speaker. Add a demonstration video that shows that really, no kidding, you are great in front of an audience. However, even if you haven’t put together a demonstration video quite yet, you’ll benefit from these six secrets to getting speaking engagements using your website page.

 

Grab their attention in seconds. Is there an emotionally engaging image or statement that will have people’s attention in seconds? What’s the killer story or set of startling statistics that will grab them instantly? What headline will wow them? Do you have an incredible book title that can be used for the name of a speech or workshop you can give? You only have a few seconds to connect with someone before they leave your website or stop watching your speaker demonstration video, so make that intro amazing. When you create a demonstration video for yourself as a speaker, you’ll want to use a highly engaging opening, too.

 

Use strong visual images. Your website or video for selling yourself as a speaker should include images of you speaking. You’ll want to get good lighting in the room if possible. If you end up doing a posed shot with good lighting before the audience shows up, that can work, too. If you don’t have great video of yourself speaking, you can always create a video combining still photographs, video of yourself and a narrative voice-over. Maybe you’ll add maybe some footage of yourself speaking directly to the camera. Try to get photographs of yourself speaking at more than one venue. If you can, get a still photo or video of your audience laughing or looking engaged. The point is not just to show how authoritative you look standing up there but how audiences relate to you. Again, if you haven’t created a demonstration video yet, at least start with a strong visual image of yourself speaking and add it to a website page about yourself as a speaker.

 

Be energetic. If you’re naturally introverted and low-key, turn up the volume on your energy when you’re speaking and being videotaped or when you’re recording an audio of your voice. You don’t have to speak a mile a minute as if you’re about to say, “But wait! There’s more! For just $9.99, you can also get—” If you’re reassuring, warm, and gentle, speaking like a soft-spoken, then that’s the authentic you and you should be authentic. Just question whether you don’t need to step up your energy a bit for a live audience to be engaged by you. Let your enthusiasm for your topic show. Let people feel how passionate you are about helping them. That enthusiasm and passion should come through in your website copy, too. Use strong verbs to make emotionally engaging statements. (I wrote about strong verbs in a previous blog piece.)

 

Demonstrate your expertise. Show what an expert you are. Mention your book and be sure to show the jacket. If you haven’t published your book yet, get a jacket made anyway—a mock-up that can be changed down the road. Offer written testimonials or video testimonials from clients who rave about your work, whether it’s how engaging you are as a speaker, how working with you one-on-one benefitted them, or how your ideas solved a problem they had struggled with for a long time. Ask people if you can use an image of their face or their company logo in conjunction with their words of praise. If they’re not sure what to say, ask them to pick their favorite thing about your presentation and share that. Be sure to list any organizations or groups you’ve spoken to in the past.

 

Offer more than one potential lecture or workshop topic. Suggest to potential clients for your speaking services a few topics on which you can speak. Try to come up with snappy titles for your potential speeches. A short description of the topic can help, too.

 

 Give them a call to action: Book me now! At the end of any presentation, you’ll want a call to action. At the end of your video, give information about how someone can contact you to book you as a speaker. At the bottom of your website page that offers your services as a speaker, be sure you have your contact information or a link to your contact form—and you might want to provide a phone number, too.

 

speaking engagements author platform

Build your author platform with speaking engagements.

 

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We all have a book inside us. We may even have several! If you want to write a book based on your life, are you clear on the type of book you would like to write? I have seven options for you—six nonfiction and one fiction—that might fit well with your plan to write a book.

I like to say a book is a credibility card that solidifies your brand and message. Should you write a memoir, focusing on your personal story?  Would it make more sense to write a book about what you have learned, one that features pieces of your story and a short summary of it at the beginning of the book?

Many of my clients have struggled with the question of what type of book to write to most effectively communicate their ideas and establish their brand and get their message out there. Some of my clients have pivoted with their brand, and a book has been instrumental in helping them do that. For example, one wanted to move from a more straightforward health brand to one that was more lifestyle oriented.

Other clients of mine have wanted to write their story as a book so they can inspire others but soon came to see that a memoir needs to be about a specific theme in their life that ties into their central message.

My video, How to Write a Book Based on Your Life, goes into some detail about the seven different types of books you might write. They are:

An autobiography or personal history. This type of personal project lets you tell your story to future generations. How I wish that my great-grandmother had written such a book so I could know more about how she went from having just a six-grade education to running a family business! Your great-grandchildren would surely appreciate a professionally written book telling your life story.

A memoir. Memoirs are thematic and often focus on just one aspect of a person’s life. Some authors write more than one memoir. Common themes including coming of age and the hero’s journey. Memoirs have a wider audience than an autobiography or personal history.

A life lessons book. Like a memoir, a life lessons book is thematic, but the themes are summed up with compelling statements. I love the title of the book by Starbucks founder Howard Behar, written with Janet Goldstein: It’s Not About the CoffeeWhat a great title that summarizes the book’s central message! All of his chapter titles are statements and lessons that we can learn from.

A business book. A business book can be part memoir, part life-lessons book. The key is to know your best stories and match them up with key ideas you want to put across (for example, that the Starbucks brand is NOT about the coffee!)

A self-help book. I specialize in helping people write this type of book. You may have seen my video on how to structure a self-help book. In it, I offer a structure that I have seen work time and time again. The book should take readers on a journey from here to there so that by the end of the book, they feel their life has changed and they know how to apply your ideas to their own life to make it better. There are two key elements in self-help books: the takeaway and the action plan. (You do not necessarily need an action plan, but you definitely need takeaway, as I explain in my video on How to Write a Book Based on Your Life.)

A parenting book. I cowrote an evergreen parenting book that continues to sell year after year (hence “evergreen”). In fact, it has sold over 130,000 copies. Now, I am not the expert of all time on parenting (my son would agree with me on that!). However, I did interviews and research, synthesized ideas, drew on my own experiences as a child and as a parent, and put it all together with the help of my coauthor, my son’s occupational therapist who treated him. We came up with a parenting book filled with tips and strategies I knew parents needed. I turned myself into an expert in the process. (Two book award committees and dozens of reviewers and endorsers apparently agree, because Raising a Sensory Smart Child has gotten a phenomenal response from those folks.) My coauthor, Lindsey Biel, OTR/L, provided the therapist’s perspective, which broadened the appeal of the book. You might want to consider a coauthor or at least a foreword from someone who has professional credentials who can vouch for the credibility of your parenting advice.

A novel. You can “fictionalize” your life and start writing a novel. Know whether you are going to make it a mystery, a romance, commercial women’s fiction (such as a novel about a mother and daughter who experience conflict they have to resolve), or a work of literary fiction. Know the conventions of these types of books so that you are clear on what you are writing. If you are going to write commercial women’s fiction, read some novels in that category. There’s an old saying: To be a good writer, you have to be a good reader. Did you know that bestselling novelist Jeffrey Archer said he read 100 novels before starting his own? That might have been more than he needed to read, but it goes to show you really do have to familiarize yourself with the type of book you want to write.

I also talk in my video How to Write a Book Based on Your Life about using sensory detail and storytelling so that you “show, don’t tell”—another old saying in the book biz. When you write, put us in the middle of the action and the moment of the scene, even if you are just writing an anecdote in a business book so you emotionally engage us. You don’t have to go on for pages giving us exhaustive detail about a client you worked with, but give us a sense of what it was like to be in the situation that went from uncomfortable to a sense of possibility for change. Show us how you overcame your bad habit of saying “yes, of course” and instead saying, “I’ll need to get more details before I commit to doing that.” Even a nonfiction book has a narrative arc. Perhaps you will show us how you went from hating your body to feeling grateful for the healthy body you inhabit, from weighing yourself obsessively to telling your scale, “Kiss my butt, buddy,” and weighing yourself once a year, not obsessing about the number. You started at a low place and achieved success in some area of your life. People want to see how you did that, and your book can do the job of conveying your story.

Need help conceptualizing your book? Stuck on the title and overarching theme? Not sure if you should go with life lessons around your parenting successes or with a funny memoir? I can help. Give me some details about where you are in your process. Think about where you see yourself going with this book (doing podcasts and public speaking? being on local TV and radio talk shows? having a blog and newsletter along with a popular Instagram account?). And let me know if you’re ready for a one-hour consultation call and perhaps some coaching as you start your writing process. Contact me and let’s get you firmly on the road to writing and publishing your book.

 

how to write a book 7 ways

How to write a book based on your story or work: I can help you figure out what type of book you want to write.

A rose by any other name would smell as sweet, Shakespeare wrote, but what author name do you want to use for your books? You may not have chosen your birth name, but you do have a choice when it comes to choosing your author name.

As I was reminded of when listening to this excellent podcast on Metadata for Authors over at the IngramSpark website, you want to be consistent in how your author name appears on your books, your websites, your blog pieces, and in any publicity you do as you build your author platform and following. Do you want to use your middle initial or full name? This could be advantageous if you have a common name or if there’s another author who has already established herself as Franchesca Millhouse. Believe me, you might think you have an unusual name, but when you Google it, you might find—well, not so much! Who knew there was more than one Franchesca Millhouse (or whatever your name is) in the universe and she’s all over the Internet and just wrote a book?

Once you have chosen your author name, stick with it. Buy the URL. Secure the dot com of your name and any variations on your name if you can. Dot com is still the preferred website address. It will cost you probably ten or twenty dollars to reserve your name’s URL for a couple of years. Invest in the likelihood that you will use this website address/URL. You don’t have to worry about hosting services or putting up your website—at least, not for the moment.

So whether you are known as John Smith or Franchesca Millhouse, when choosing your author name, do a little research, think about what version of your name would work best for you, and grab that URL.

 

choosing your author name write my book

Choosing your author name? Pick one you will use consistently and that will set you apart from every other person who shares your name.

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Seeking a book deal? Definitely self-publishing? Either way, you need to know how to create a comparative books list. Believe me, as an in-house acquisitions editor at G. P. Putnam’s Sons/Perigee Books and HarperCollins Publishers, I relied on a strong comparative books list to make my case to my colleagues that the book project I was enthusiastic about would be a good investment for the company. When I work with clients to create a vision plan for their book, I find they often get stuck on this crucial piece of their publishing plan. That’s why I wanted to offer some advice here on 4 ways to distinguish your book from comparative books.

 

1. Offer a definitive, big picture view. Maybe the other books out there just don’t give the broader, comprehensive view many readers seek. For example, my book, Raising a Sensory Smart Child, coauthored with Lindsey Biel, is (as the subtitle promises) “The Definitive Handbook for Helping Your Child with Sensory Processing Issues.” As the parent of a child with sensory processing disorder, I didn’t want to buy a dozen books to get the information I needed. I wanted one definitive handbook or “bible.” I’m proud to say that several parents who reviewed it called it their “sensory processing disorder bible.”

 

2. Offer a more focused view. Sometimes, your best bet is to go in the opposite direction of a comprehensive guide—to focus instead on just one specific topic. Many books grow out of a chapter in a previous book or an idea that the previous book inspired. Cinematherapy Goes to the Oscars, which I coauthored with Beverly West, looked specifically at Academy-Award-winning movies and appealed not just to Cinematherapy fans but to fans of the Academy Awards. You might expand on a topic introduced in your previous book or on a topic that came up when doing publicity and marketing for the book. Every year, Bev and I did an annual Cinematherapy Awards press release to tie in with the Academy Awards nominations, and realized that this annual event provided a great way to talk about movies—and in our case, to talk about them in a different way.

 

3. Offer a brand no one can resist. The words you use to convey your message can set your book apart in the marketplace, not just because the words are appealing but because the voice in your writing matches that branding. The bestseller You Are a Badass: How to Stop Doubting Your Greatness and Start Living an Awesome Life had an emotional appeal that made it sound like more than just a self-help book on gaining confidence so that you could improve your life. No, it’s a book about being a badass living an awesome life someone who has greatness ought to be living! The edgy word “badass” is key to the brand. Books can serve as credibility cards for your work as an expert, so choose your wording and graphic look carefully as you create or refresh your brand.

 

4. Offer an updated approach. Even books on so-called “evergreen” topics, like how to become more assertive or how to become more effective at finding a soulmate, need to be updated as society changes and technology alters how we interact with each other and find, share, and save information. Maybe all the books out there on dating don’t cover the complexities of dating when the reader is gender-nonconforming, or they don’t incorporate information on how to use the latest dating apps. Although technology changes, general ways of using tech can remain the same for several years before you need to update. Think “what’s the strategy” not “what’s the specific technology people are using today.”

Sensory Books sensory diet

A comprehensive approach might be the key to making your book stand out among comparative books.

 

I hope these tips make it easier for you to set yourself apart from comparative books. If you’re still struggling with your brand, and would like to work with me on branding, contact me at info@nancypeske.com and tell me are with your brand so we can set up some coaching sessions.

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